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Forms (Family Law)

Local and Statewide Forms

CAUTION! If your case involves complicated legal issues, you may seriously harm your legal rights if you use these forms without consulting with a lawyer. You are strongly urged to talk to a lawyer. You may find a lawyer by calling the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service and Modest Means program at 1.800.452.7636. You may also contact your local legal aid office. For more information about legal services and information, visit the Oregon State Bar's website.

You can print any form for free and fill it out by hand, or you may purchase complete packets from the cashier in Room 107 at the Linn County courthouse.

Interactive forms (iForms) are listed as a first choice. You may choose iForms or you may print all individual PDF forms and file conventionally.


Family Court Assistance Office – Linn County Courthouse, Room 108B

The Family Court Assistance Office is a resource for procedural questions, document review, and other information about legal service available in the community.

If you are filling out the forms, you are representing yourself. It is very important to read the instructions and carefully consider how you complete your forms. The Family Court Facilitator and court staff cannot provide legal advice. You are encouraged to consult an attorney for any legal advice.

Document review is available by appointment only Monday–Friday 8:00AM–11:45AM

Open for general questions Monday-Friday from 1:00PM – 4:00PM
*Children are not allowed to attend document review appointments

Call: 541.704.3479
Email: linnfamilycourt@ojd.state.or.us

Review Civil Records page for additional filing information.

This page contains forms specific to Linn County Circuit Court. Additional statewide forms are located on the Forms Center page.

Note: If there are two versions of any form, select the Linn version.


Dissolution of Marriage / Registered Domestic Partnership


Response
A respondent is the person who answers the other party’s petition. If you were served with a Petition for Dissolution and if you do not agree with ALL requests in the petition, you need to decide whether to file a ‘response’. The response is a document that allows you to list your objections and to make requests (counterclaims). If you agree with everything in the petition, you may not have to file a response.

Separation of Marriage / Registered Domestic Partnership


Response
A respondent is the person who answers the other party’s petition. If you were served with a Petition for Separation and if you do not agree with ALL requests in the petition, you need to decide whether to file a ‘response’. The response is a document that allows you to list your objections and to make requests (counterclaims). If you agree with everything in the petition, you may not have to file a response.

Unmarried: Custody, Parenting Time, and Child Support

After paternity ("fatherhood") has been legally established, and unmarried parent may use this packet to ask the court to establish custody, parenting time, and child support. Either parent may initiate a case. Unmarried parents have the same rights and responsibilities regarding custody and support of their children that married or divorced parents have. This packet is not appropriate for use by anyone other than the parents of the children. If someone would like to seek custody of a non-biological children, they will need to speak to an attorney.

Response
A respondent is the person who answers the other parent's Petition to establish custody and parenting time under the statute for unmarried parents (ORS 109.103).

Modification of Custody, Parenting Time, and Child Support


Response
If you were served with a Motion and Order to Show Cause re: Modification and you do not agree with ALL requests in the motion, you need to decide whether to file a 'response'. The response is a document that allows you to list your objections. If you agree with everything in the motion, you may not have to file a response.

Immediate Danger

Ordinarily the court cannot issue an order giving one party custody of a child without both parties having an opportunity to be heard. The motion seeking custody must be served on the opposing party and a hearing time set for the matter to be resolved.

One of the few exceptions to this rule is called an "Immediate Danger Order" as authorized by ORS 107.097(3). This provision requires that a court find one or more affidavits (sworn written statements) by the moving party have been filed with the court and that based on those affidavits and any testimony from the moving party that a child is in immediate danger.

What is immediate danger? Immediate danger means that there is a clear and present risk that a child will be physically injured or neglected in such a way as to endanger the child. The "risk" here is for physical injury. "Immediate" means today.

The evidence to support this finding must be truthful and credible. It must be based on the affiant’s actual observations (person signing the affidavit is the affiant).

The mere fact asserted that the other parent is abusing alcohol, abusing drugs, engaged in criminal behavior or has done these things in the past is usually not sufficient to show an immediate danger. The mere fact that a parent is ill, hospitalized, or homeless may not create an immediate danger depending on the age of the child and the overall circumstances.

The court does not need a multipage history of every event that has occurred in the family. The court requires solid evidence that there is an immediate genuine risk of harm to the child – physical harm. Today.

If these things are not supported by declarations, the court must deny the motion. If you need legal advice, please consult an attorney.

 Immediate Danger forms

Temporary Relief

Requesting Temporary Relief

Temporary relief may be requested during your pre-judgment case; however, this procedure may not be used for post-judgment relief or during a modification proceeding.


Response to Temporary Relief

If you were served with a Motion for Temporary Relief and do not agree with ALL requests in the motion, you need to decide whether to file a ‘response’. The response is a document that allows you to list your objections and to make requests (counterclaims). If you agree with everything in the motion, you may not have to file a response. Please refer to the Linn County Supplemental Local Court Rule 8.005 for further rules and instructions.

Alternative Form of Service

Notice of Change of Address

Filing Fee Waiver or Deferral

Your application case heading must be the same as the case documents you are filing. Complete the case heading and mark whether you are the Plaintiff/Petitioner or Defendant/Respondent. You must completely fill out the application. Do not leave any sections blank. Please indicate on your application if an answer is none or unknown. Date, sign, and print your name.

If you are receiving public assistance, please include proof of your assistance with your application. Court staff will be available to review your application during the acceptance hours. If you are requesting to waive sheriff service fees, your request will be sent to a judge for review. This process may take up to seven business days.

Miscellaneous

Additional Links

Linn County Family Law Resources

Oregon Legal Aid

Oregon State Bar Public Information

Oregon Child Support Program - Guidelines Calculator

Department of Justice - Child Support Information

Parenting Plan Templates (basic, safety-focused, medium/long distance)

Family Law Self-Help

Family Law Resources

Frequently Asked Questions

Circuit Court Filing Fees

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